fbpx

When shopping for a nailer, there are many options to consider. One of the decisions you would need to make is choosing between angled vs straight finish nailers.

Description
Our Pick
Milwaukee 2742-20 M18 Angled Nailer
Makita AF601 Straight Nailer
Picture
Milwaukee Electric Tool 2742-20 M18, Fuel, 16 Gauge, Angle LED Finish Nailer
Makita AF601 16 Gauge, 2-1/2" Straight Finish Nailer,
Rating
-
-
Reviews
-
-
Our Pick
Description
Milwaukee 2742-20 M18 Angled Nailer
Picture
Milwaukee Electric Tool 2742-20 M18, Fuel, 16 Gauge, Angle LED Finish Nailer
Rating
-
Reviews
-
Best Pricing
Description
Makita AF601 Straight Nailer
Picture
Makita AF601 16 Gauge, 2-1/2" Straight Finish Nailer,
Rating
-
Reviews
-
Best Pricing

The answer is not as straightforward as you think.

So, let’s take a look at how they vary and the reason for choosing one over the other.

Types Of Nailers

For most nailers, this isn’t something you need to think about.

Finishing nailers and framing nailers are pretty much the only types that come in both angled and straight options.

The finishing nailer is a nailer for baseboards and crown molding work, to name a few examples. They work with headless nails that are driven deep down the wood, leaving no visible nail heads on the finished surface.

Large projects, such as framing a home or building a deck require framing nailers. They are known to be heavy-duty and the most powerful nail guns on the market.

Differences Between Angled vs Straight Finish Nailers

Obviously, the appearance is the most significant distinction between angled vs straight finish nailers. The magazine’s angle gives these nail guns their shape.

Can you use either of them?

Assume you’re holding a nailer with the tip pointing downward and aligned to the floor.

straight nail gun looks like an ‘L’, having the nail chamber stretching from it and remaining aligned to the floor.

An angled nailer, in contrast, has the nail chamber coming up at an angle. Depending on the type of nail gun you’re looking at, the degree of this angle can vary.

Framing nailers come in a variety of sizes and angles: 34, 30, 28, and 21 degrees. The angle gets sharper with a higher degree and the space taken is reduced.

It’s important to keep in mind that this angle has no bearing on the angle at which the nail enters the wood. The nailer will drive the nail into the wood at a 90-degree angle if you keep the tip flush with the work surface.

These tools are angled specifically for taking less space and making them more versatile.

While it may seem to be a minor difference, whether a nailer is angled or straight has a significant effect on what it can be used for.

Angled Nailer

Angled nailers may use 16 gauge and other heavy gauged nails that are more durable and built to operate in tight spaces.

The nails are hidden. So, if a nail head is visible on the surface, it won’t matter as much.

Keep in mind that the sharper the angle, the more room you’ll save.

The nails in an angled finish nailer are slightly bigger, owing to the magazine’s nature. The design helps them to carry bigger nails and drive them more effectively into the surface.

These nails are also more expensive and harder to find compared to those used in straight nailers.

Benefits

  • When installing trim, paneling, etc. you need to be able to work around walls, corners, and doors
  • Useful for cabinet-making
  • Ability to work in tight spaces

Drawbacks

  • Nails are more difficult to get and a bit more expensive.

Straight Nailer

straight nailer uses thinner nails, making the nail head not as noticeable. They’re difficult to fit into smaller spaces, so they’re often used on surfaces with more room.

While they lack the precision and agility of angled finish nailers, they are ideal for framing and doing basic projects.

Benefits

  • Nail holes that are smaller are easier to conceal
  • Great for basic, straightforward framing and construction
  • It costs less compared to straight nailers

Drawbacks

  • Not possible to fit into small spaces
  • Bulkier

Conclusion

When it comes to angled vs straight finish nailers, what is the best option for your project?

There is no one-size-fits-all answer. Like most other things, the selection is determined by how you plan to use it.

An angled nailer is a better option if you are planning to work in tight spaces and need a bit more leverage on where you drive the nail.

By Robin M


Robin remains an active participant in the skilled trades community. His hands-on involvement in projects, coupled with a genuine enthusiasm for helping others succeed in their home improvement pursuits, reflects his commitment to empowering readers with the knowledge they need to tackle projects confidently.

{"email":"Email address invalid","url":"Website address invalid","required":"Required field missing"}

Related Posts

Subscribe now to get the latest updates!